How to practice chest and collarbone yogic breathing

How to practice chest and collarbone yogic breathing

In the previous article, I wrote about the importance of full yogic breath, its effects, and also about the initial stage, that is the abdominal yogic breath. Now, let’s focus on the description and practice of the middle and upper yogic breathing.

What is Full Yogic Breath & How to Practice Abdominal Breathing

Chest Yogic Breath

Otherwise known as the chest breathing, is the second part of the complete yogic breathing and is about strong chest movement.  The expansion of intercostal muscles takes place during inhalation. Their movement helps ribs to stretch out and adds volume to the chest bringing oxygen-rich air to our lungs. While we exhale these muscles relax and chest gets back into starting position.

Effects of middle yogic breath mainly relate to the heart and its health. While we breathe fully into the chest, heart muscle gets free space for its movement, nothing stands in its way. Poor dynamics in this area may, therefore, cause cardiovascular health problems. The middle yogic breath helps to prevent these diseases.

 

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Chest Yogic Breath Practice

Version 1

  1. Place your hands on the chest. Fingertips are touching.
  2. Breathe into the chest and feel how your fingers are drawing apart.
  3. Exhale completely sensing your chest moving backward. Fingers are slowly moving toward each other.

The Exhalation is twice as long as the inhalation. Repeat this 5 to 10 times.

Version 2

Place your hands on either side of your chest, fingers pointing upward. Inhale and exhale deeply. Observe how your chest is moving to sides. Repeat 5 to 10 times.

Version 3

Keep your arms on the sides, just turn your hands downwards so that your fingers are pointing down. Feel your chest movements toward the floor.

Repeat 5 to 10 times.

You may also lie down in the Savasana pose to sense better the chest breathing into your middle back.

 

Collarbone Yogic Breath

Also called clavicular breathing. It characterized by inhalation and exhalation to the highest parts of lungs. We talk about the area around the back of the neck and upper parts of the thorax, where we feel respiratory movements to a lesser extent. But it’s important to be aware of it and practice even this last part of the breath. A weak upper yogic breathing in this part of the body is reflected in an increased stress, which can lead to a headache, upper respiratory tract infection, and stiff neck. By proper upper breathing, we prevent these diseases.

 

Collarbone Yogic Breath Practice

Version 1

Place your hands on the collar bones and breathe deeply into the highest parts of your lungs. You may slip your thumbs into armpits.

Repeat 5 to 10x.

Version 2

Then cross your arms over the chest and place your hand into the armpits. Breathe deeply sensing how your lungs are filling with air. Let your shoulders relaxed moving up and down.

Repeat 5 to 10x.

 

Complete Yogic Breath Practice

Finally, let’s combine it together with the help of our arms. It is a very effective exercise, to help you understand complexity and sequence inspiratory and expiratory pressure in the human body.

  1. Place your hands in front of your lower belly, right hand on your left.
  2. In the first phase breathe into the abdomen whilst raising arms forward. We are counting to three.
  3. In the second phase breathe into the chest, stretch arms sideways whilst counting to three.
  4. In the third phase raise arms upward breathe into the upper parts of lungs whilst counting to three.
  5. Hands together, stretch your upper body and shortly hold your breath.
  6. Slowly exhale, place your arms back down and your hands behind your back.
  7. The Exhalation is twice as long as the inhalation. Shortly hold your breath and Repeat this exercise 5 to 10 times.

 

Please, join me in this full yogic breath practice on Yogalactic.org
YouTube channel
.